Help and Hope to Struggling Teens and Families | by Jeannette Moninger

Denver Springs Behavioral Health Center

Posted on Mon, Apr 29, 2019

Struggling adolescents and their families are finding help and hope at Denver Springs. The Englewood-based behavioral health center opened in July 2017 and provides services for anyone ages 12 and older. A separate outpatient clinic for adolescents is slated to open in July in Parker. Here’s a look at how Denver Springs can help your family.

Anxiety and depression, as well as substance abuse issues and suicide, are on the rise among youths nationally and here in Colorado. An estimated one in three Colorado teens have experienced a major depressive episode in the past 12 months, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 

Struggling adolescents and their families are finding help and hope at Denver Springs. The Englewood-based behavioral health center opened in July 2017 and provides services for anyone ages 12 and older. A separate outpatient clinic for adolescents is slated to open in July in Parker. Here’s a look at how Denver Springs can help your family.

Mental health assessments: A mental health counselor is available 24/7 to assess your child’s situation and determine the appropriate level of care. There’s no need to schedule an appointment and no charge for an evaluation. “We might recommend one of our programs or refer you to a community mental health provider,” says Dr. Adam Richmond, Denver Springs medical director. He urges families to seek help immediately if there are concerns about a child’s mental well-being. “Don’t try to be your child’s therapist. Get professional help.” 

Inpatient treatment: The center provides around-the-clock care for teenagers experiencing a mental health crisis, such as suicidal thoughts. “We offer a full day of group therapies, including activity, art, music and pet therapy,” says professional counselor Martha Johnson. “We also spend time each day outside or in our gym to provide the most comprehensive wellness program.” Teens will see a licensed psychiatric medication provider, such as Dr. Richmond, who is a board-certified child and adolescent psychiatrist, for medications to manage depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder or other problems.

Partial hospitalization program (PHP): This program is geared towards adolescents who are struggling with mental health issues but who don’t require strict safety measures. Participants attend the program Monday through Friday for six hours each day, returning home to their families each evening. PHP offers teens a safe place to participate in group therapy with individual and family check-ins for safety planning and care coordination. Teens meet with a psychiatric nurse practitioner for a medication evaluation, but may not be prescribed medications. Most adolescents participate in PHP for approximately two to three weeks.

Intensive outpatient program (IOP): This group-based therapy helps teenagers learn healthier ways to cope and manage emotions around a variety of mental health issues, including substance use. Three-hour IOP sessions take place three nights a week. “There’s a lot of character-building exercises and camaraderie,” says Johnson. IOP typically lasts four to six weeks. 

Denver Springs

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